Topics

Helping Make Conferences Inclusive


Brenda Buchanan
 

Hello all,

Two nights ago I saw a tweet from Kellye Garrett saying Crime Writers of Color is offering to proactively assist organizers of crime writing conferences who aren't sure how to make their events more inclusive.  She said the folks behind two conferences already had been in touch to ask for help. By putting it out on Twitter, she was hoping for more.

I responded that I believed we Queer Crime Writers would be willing to do our part as well. Kellye and some others (including Lori Rader-Day, current president of Sisters in Crime) liked the comment.

Is anyone else interested in this?  I imagine we will need to identify at least a couple of point people.  I'm willing to be one of them. 

I'm done sitting through conferences where there might be a panel involving queer writers, and then it is just one panel, where the discussion is kind of predictable. Nothing wrong with that panel, but our conferences need to look like the our world, with robust representation of out queer writers, on a wide variety of panels, not just the "gay panel."

Anyone with me on this?  If so, it's time to reach out to CWofC and offer our support/help for this initiative, and publicize our willingness.

Thanks!

Brenda B. in Maine


Dharma Kelleher
 

I saw that too. I’d be happy to do what I can. 

I’m not planning on attending any conferences this year due to budget constraints. However, I am signed up for Left Coast Crime 2021. 

Peace out,
Dharma Kelleher

Gritty Crime Fiction with a Feminist Kick
https://dharmakelleher.com


On Jan 23, 2020, at 7:24 PM, Brenda Buchanan <brenda@...> wrote:

Hello all,

Two nights ago I saw a tweet from Kellye Garrett saying Crime Writers of Color is offering to proactively assist organizers of crime writing conferences who aren't sure how to make their events more inclusive.  She said the folks behind two conferences already had been in touch to ask for help. By putting it out on Twitter, she was hoping for more.

I responded that I believed we Queer Crime Writers would be willing to do our part as well. Kellye and some others (including Lori Rader-Day, current president of Sisters in Crime) liked the comment.

Is anyone else interested in this?  I imagine we will need to identify at least a couple of point people.  I'm willing to be one of them. 

I'm done sitting through conferences where there might be a panel involving queer writers, and then it is just one panel, where the discussion is kind of predictable. Nothing wrong with that panel, but our conferences need to look like the our world, with robust representation of out queer writers, on a wide variety of panels, not just the "gay panel."

Anyone with me on this?  If so, it's time to reach out to CWofC and offer our support/help for this initiative, and publicize our willingness.

Thanks!

Brenda B. in Maine


cheryl head
 

Brenda:  This is a great idea and a smart instinct.  I hope some others here will step up to support the efforts of CWoC.  We have a few people (like me) who straddle both groups.  I can't raise my hand to volunteer, because I am starting my first year on the Bouchercon Board and doing what I can (from the inside) to keep that conference engaged in diversity, but I'll support whatever you decide to do.

Cheryl

On Thu, Jan 23, 2020 at 10:05 PM Dharma Kelleher <dharma.kelleher@...> wrote:
I saw that too. I’d be happy to do what I can. 

I’m not planning on attending any conferences this year due to budget constraints. However, I am signed up for Left Coast Crime 2021. 

Peace out,
Dharma Kelleher

Gritty Crime Fiction with a Feminist Kick


On Jan 23, 2020, at 7:24 PM, Brenda Buchanan <brenda@...> wrote:

Hello all,

Two nights ago I saw a tweet from Kellye Garrett saying Crime Writers of Color is offering to proactively assist organizers of crime writing conferences who aren't sure how to make their events more inclusive.  She said the folks behind two conferences already had been in touch to ask for help. By putting it out on Twitter, she was hoping for more.

I responded that I believed we Queer Crime Writers would be willing to do our part as well. Kellye and some others (including Lori Rader-Day, current president of Sisters in Crime) liked the comment.

Is anyone else interested in this?  I imagine we will need to identify at least a couple of point people.  I'm willing to be one of them. 

I'm done sitting through conferences where there might be a panel involving queer writers, and then it is just one panel, where the discussion is kind of predictable. Nothing wrong with that panel, but our conferences need to look like the our world, with robust representation of out queer writers, on a wide variety of panels, not just the "gay panel."

Anyone with me on this?  If so, it's time to reach out to CWofC and offer our support/help for this initiative, and publicize our willingness.

Thanks!

Brenda B. in Maine



--
Cheryl Head
Author, Charlie Mack Motown Mysteries
Director of Inclusion, Golden Crown Literary Society


John Copenhaver
 

Hi, Brenda,

I sent a message last night, but I don't think it went through. We must've been sharing a brain. I was corresponding with Kellye yesterday and send Kristen at email last night. Anyway, yes, I'd love to be involved. I've been to Malice, Thrillerfest, and B-con—and happy to talk to anyone about inclusivity and how to avoid tokenizing LGBTQ writers.

It's a great idea.

-John


Stefani Deoul
 

Happy to assist,
Stefani


Dharma Kelleher
 

I personally would love to see more transgender crime writers. Right now, I think Renee James and I are the only ones. 

Peace out,
Dharma Kelleher

Gritty Crime Fiction with a Feminist Kick
https://dharmakelleher.com


On Jan 23, 2020, at 8:05 PM, Dharma Kelleher <dharma.kelleher@...> wrote:

I saw that too. I’d be happy to do what I can. 

I’m not planning on attending any conferences this year due to budget constraints. However, I am signed up for Left Coast Crime 2021. 

Peace out,
Dharma Kelleher

Gritty Crime Fiction with a Feminist Kick
https://dharmakelleher.com


On Jan 23, 2020, at 7:24 PM, Brenda Buchanan <brenda@...> wrote:

Hello all,

Two nights ago I saw a tweet from Kellye Garrett saying Crime Writers of Color is offering to proactively assist organizers of crime writing conferences who aren't sure how to make their events more inclusive.  She said the folks behind two conferences already had been in touch to ask for help. By putting it out on Twitter, she was hoping for more.

I responded that I believed we Queer Crime Writers would be willing to do our part as well. Kellye and some others (including Lori Rader-Day, current president of Sisters in Crime) liked the comment.

Is anyone else interested in this?  I imagine we will need to identify at least a couple of point people.  I'm willing to be one of them. 

I'm done sitting through conferences where there might be a panel involving queer writers, and then it is just one panel, where the discussion is kind of predictable. Nothing wrong with that panel, but our conferences need to look like the our world, with robust representation of out queer writers, on a wide variety of panels, not just the "gay panel."

Anyone with me on this?  If so, it's time to reach out to CWofC and offer our support/help for this initiative, and publicize our willingness.

Thanks!

Brenda B. in Maine


Neil Plakcy
 

I'm willing to help out, too. I'm heading for Malice Domestic in May, but since Kristopher Zygorski is on the board, I'm sure it will be an inclusive conference.

After that I plan on Ninc in St. Petersburg Beach in September, then, if I can get in, GRL in St. Louis.

Neil Plakcy


Hawthorn Mineart
 

I would feel much more comfortable at conferences that had a standard code of conduct for speakers and attendees that covered inclusiveness of LGBT folks, people of color and making spaces accessible for people with disabilities. That would go a long way towards setting the tone for inclusiveness. It might curb lots of the behavior that has happened at various writing cons over the last few years.

I know there are large conferences out that do have codes of conduct and policies. Maybe it's possible to craft an ideal one to suggest to conference organizers.

My free time is a bit limited because I'm on the board of Speed City Sisters in Crime and they keep me on my toes. I'm also trying to prioritize actually getting a first draft done. But I'll support efforts where I can.


Hawthorn Mineart
 

I'm also a trans crime writer. I'm not yet published. I just had my first short story accepted for Speed City Sisters in Crime's Murder 20/20 anthology, though, so I'm almost there.

I'm working away at a couple of crime/detective novels and need to pick one and get it done. :)


Dharma Kelleher
 

Awesome!!!!

Peace out,
Dharma Kelleher

Gritty Crime Fiction with a Feminist Kick
https://dharmakelleher.com


On Jan 24, 2020, at 3:20 PM, Hawthorn Mineart <hawthorn.mineart@...> wrote:

I'm also a trans crime writer. I'm not yet published. I just had my first short story accepted for Speed City Sisters in Crime's Murder 20/20 anthology, though, so I'm almost there.

I'm working away at a couple of crime/detective novels and need to pick one and get it done. :)


Brenda Buchanan
 

I'll be happy to contact CWoC and convey the gist of this conversation, and give my name as a contact person for connecting with queer (including trans) writers.  I see John, Dharma, Stefani, Neil and Catherine have your hands up to help.  Thank you.

It's great (but not surprising) to hear so much support for this idea.  John Copenhaver, when you spoke with Kellye and Kristen were you talking about this, or something else?

I'll update everyone when I have more info.


Brenda


Dharma Kelleher
 

Thanks, Brenda!!!!

Peace out,
Dharma Kelleher
Gritty Crime Fiction with a Feminist Kick

https://dharmakelleher.com


On Jan 25, 2020, at 12:11 PM, Brenda Buchanan <brenda@...> wrote:

I'll be happy to contact CWoC and convey the gist of this conversation, and give my name as a contact person for connecting with queer (including trans) writers.  I see John, Dharma, Stefani, Neil and Catherine have your hands up to help.  Thank you.

It's great (but not surprising) to hear so much support for this idea.  John Copenhaver, when you spoke with Kellye and Kristen were you talking about this, or something else?

I'll update everyone when I have more info.


Brenda


Anne
 

I meant to raise my hand earlier. I’d love to be part of the effort to make conferences more inclusive. Thanks for considering me. 

Anne
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Greg Herren
 

Brenda:

Terrific! Thanks to all who volunteered to step up and do this important work.

I am not sure how every conference works, but I can let you all know that having a liaison to Bouchercon is a little trickier than one might think. I am on their national board, but the national board has very little--if any--control over the local organizing committees (LOC's). The LOC's run the event and simply file reports periodically with the national board; so any liaison to assist with diversity issues with programming etc. would have to work with the individual LOC's rather than the national board. Malice Domestic is different because it's in the same city every year, so their board has no need for a local committee. I'm not sure if Left Coast works the same way Bouchercon does or if it follows the Malice model instead, or has its own model, but I can find out. I know the person who's programming this year's Left Coast, and I know she is committed to having a diverse program--it's Lisa Brackmann; some of you might also know her. 

Margery Flax and I had to step in at the last minute to program Dallas Bouchercon, but Margery and I tried to make the program as diverse as possible without singling out the diverse writers. We did do a diversity panel--that was in the works before we took over the program; the goal of the panel, which was called "Not a Diversity Panel", was to simply treat the panelists as authors and if diversity issues came up organically on the panel it was okay, but as moderator, I wasn't going to ask questions about diversity issues nor was I going to take them from the audience. Alas, I got sick and was unable to attend, so I don't know how it went--I think it did turn into a diversity panel after all, but no one had any issues with it; at least none that I have heard of.

I was also elected Executive Vice-President of MWA last weekend. I think I may be the first openly gay author of openly gay work to hold this position. The MWA board has five queers on it now--two men, three women--which may be the most it's ever had. MWA's chapter system is based on geography; and while members have the right to choose to belong to a chapter outside of where they actually live, it doesn't happen very often. Bearing this in mind, and knowing that authors of color and queer authors who belong to MWA are therefore scattered all over the country and might feel like they don't have a voice in the organization, we are taking steps to recognize Crime Writers of Color and Queer Crime Writers as recognized caucuses within the organization, so that both groups can not only have a voice in MWA, but also so that the MWA board also can come to both groups with questions, concerns, and ask for advice on how to make the organization more welcoming and diverse.
 
I also realize that MWA's membership requirements for active status might be problematic, and it's not inexpensive. But I am hopeful that by making the oldest and most prestigious crime writer's organization more welcoming and diverse, the others will follow suit. Sisters in Crime is also doing excellent work; I write a diversity column called The Conversation Continues for their quarterly newsletter, and I know their new president, Lori Rader-Day, is very committed to diversity.

For now, the recognition of the caucuses is unofficial--we are investigating how to make them official under our current by-laws--and I've already talked to Kristen about repping Queer Crime Writers as a group to MWA, since she is already on the board --that way we can get things rolling already.

Are there any Dreamspinner authors here? The recent RWA situation has brought the problems with that publisher to our attention--please email me off this list directly at gregh121@... if you are a Dreamspinner or ChiZine author. You do not have to be an MWA member to talk to me about issues with those publishers.

Back to Bouchercon: I know Sacramento (this year) is also committed to a diverse program, as is Minneapolis in 2022 (one of the co-chairs is Terri Bischoff, a lesbian). New Orleans is 2021, and I don't know who on the local committee is going to be doing the programming--but I can find out. I also think there's a possibility of a bid to host 2023 in Philadelphia. 

Also, I encourage any or all of you to submit a short story to this year's Bouchercon anthology, California Screamin'. It's being edited by Art Taylor, and I know he is looking for diversity in the anthology. I've been in two Bouchercon anthologies, and Neil Plakcy was also in Florida Happens.  The submission call is here: shorturl.at/djsHT

I may be doing the New Orleans anthology again next year--not sure--but I have already committed to co-editing the Minneapolis anthology with Terri Bischoff.




xogreg


Dharma Kelleher
 

Thanks for all of this, Greg. 

Peace out,
Dharma Kelleher

Gritty Crime Fiction with a Feminist Kick
https://dharmakelleher.com


On Jan 27, 2020, at 7:26 AM, Greg Herren via Groups.Io <gregh121@...> wrote:


Brenda:

Terrific! Thanks to all who volunteered to step up and do this important work.

I am not sure how every conference works, but I can let you all know that having a liaison to Bouchercon is a little trickier than one might think. I am on their national board, but the national board has very little--if any--control over the local organizing committees (LOC's). The LOC's run the event and simply file reports periodically with the national board; so any liaison to assist with diversity issues with programming etc. would have to work with the individual LOC's rather than the national board. Malice Domestic is different because it's in the same city every year, so their board has no need for a local committee. I'm not sure if Left Coast works the same way Bouchercon does or if it follows the Malice model instead, or has its own model, but I can find out. I know the person who's programming this year's Left Coast, and I know she is committed to having a diverse program--it's Lisa Brackmann; some of you might also know her. 

Margery Flax and I had to step in at the last minute to program Dallas Bouchercon, but Margery and I tried to make the program as diverse as possible without singling out the diverse writers. We did do a diversity panel--that was in the works before we took over the program; the goal of the panel, which was called "Not a Diversity Panel", was to simply treat the panelists as authors and if diversity issues came up organically on the panel it was okay, but as moderator, I wasn't going to ask questions about diversity issues nor was I going to take them from the audience. Alas, I got sick and was unable to attend, so I don't know how it went--I think it did turn into a diversity panel after all, but no one had any issues with it; at least none that I have heard of.

I was also elected Executive Vice-President of MWA last weekend. I think I may be the first openly gay author of openly gay work to hold this position. The MWA board has five queers on it now--two men, three women--which may be the most it's ever had. MWA's chapter system is based on geography; and while members have the right to choose to belong to a chapter outside of where they actually live, it doesn't happen very often. Bearing this in mind, and knowing that authors of color and queer authors who belong to MWA are therefore scattered all over the country and might feel like they don't have a voice in the organization, we are taking steps to recognize Crime Writers of Color and Queer Crime Writers as recognized caucuses within the organization, so that both groups can not only have a voice in MWA, but also so that the MWA board also can come to both groups with questions, concerns, and ask for advice on how to make the organization more welcoming and diverse.
 
I also realize that MWA's membership requirements for active status might be problematic, and it's not inexpensive. But I am hopeful that by making the oldest and most prestigious crime writer's organization more welcoming and diverse, the others will follow suit. Sisters in Crime is also doing excellent work; I write a diversity column called The Conversation Continues for their quarterly newsletter, and I know their new president, Lori Rader-Day, is very committed to diversity.

For now, the recognition of the caucuses is unofficial--we are investigating how to make them official under our current by-laws--and I've already talked to Kristen about repping Queer Crime Writers as a group to MWA, since she is already on the board --that way we can get things rolling already.

Are there any Dreamspinner authors here? The recent RWA situation has brought the problems with that publisher to our attention--please email me off this list directly at gregh121@... if you are a Dreamspinner or ChiZine author. You do not have to be an MWA member to talk to me about issues with those publishers.

Back to Bouchercon: I know Sacramento (this year) is also committed to a diverse program, as is Minneapolis in 2022 (one of the co-chairs is Terri Bischoff, a lesbian). New Orleans is 2021, and I don't know who on the local committee is going to be doing the programming--but I can find out. I also think there's a possibility of a bid to host 2023 in Philadelphia. 

Also, I encourage any or all of you to submit a short story to this year's Bouchercon anthology, California Screamin'. It's being edited by Art Taylor, and I know he is looking for diversity in the anthology. I've been in two Bouchercon anthologies, and Neil Plakcy was also in Florida Happens.  The submission call is here: shorturl.at/djsHT

I may be doing the New Orleans anthology again next year--not sure--but I have already committed to co-editing the Minneapolis anthology with Terri Bischoff.




xogreg


John Copenhaver
 

Greg, congrats being elected VP of MWA! When I saw the photo on FB, I was excited to see so many LGBTQ faces. Thanks so much for this information. You answered so many questions that I—and I imagine others—had. 

I’m happy to be involved however I can be useful. It’s a serious concern, I think, that it's cost-prohibitive for some queer crime writers or PoC crime writers to join organizations like MWA or to attend conferences. Are there any scholarships available  … or the possibility of establishing something like that? It’s something to think about.

-John



On Jan 27, 2020, at 9:26 AM, Greg Herren via Groups.Io <gregh121@...> wrote:

Brenda:

Terrific! Thanks to all who volunteered to step up and do this important work.

I am not sure how every conference works, but I can let you all know that having a liaison to Bouchercon is a little trickier than one might think. I am on their national board, but the national board has very little--if any--control over the local organizing committees (LOC's). The LOC's run the event and simply file reports periodically with the national board; so any liaison to assist with diversity issues with programming etc. would have to work with the individual LOC's rather than the national board. Malice Domestic is different because it's in the same city every year, so their board has no need for a local committee. I'm not sure if Left Coast works the same way Bouchercon does or if it follows the Malice model instead, or has its own model, but I can find out. I know the person who's programming this year's Left Coast, and I know she is committed to having a diverse program--it's Lisa Brackmann; some of you might also know her. 

Margery Flax and I had to step in at the last minute to program Dallas Bouchercon, but Margery and I tried to make the program as diverse as possible without singling out the diverse writers. We did do a diversity panel--that was in the works before we took over the program; the goal of the panel, which was called "Not a Diversity Panel", was to simply treat the panelists as authors and if diversity issues came up organically on the panel it was okay, but as moderator, I wasn't going to ask questions about diversity issues nor was I going to take them from the audience. Alas, I got sick and was unable to attend, so I don't know how it went--I think it did turn into a diversity panel after all, but no one had any issues with it; at least none that I have heard of.

I was also elected Executive Vice-President of MWA last weekend. I think I may be the first openly gay author of openly gay work to hold this position. The MWA board has five queers on it now--two men, three women--which may be the most it's ever had. MWA's chapter system is based on geography; and while members have the right to choose to belong to a chapter outside of where they actually live, it doesn't happen very often. Bearing this in mind, and knowing that authors of color and queer authors who belong to MWA are therefore scattered all over the country and might feel like they don't have a voice in the organization, we are taking steps to recognize Crime Writers of Color and Queer Crime Writers as recognized caucuses within the organization, so that both groups can not only have a voice in MWA, but also so that the MWA board also can come to both groups with questions, concerns, and ask for advice on how to make the organization more welcoming and diverse.
 
I also realize that MWA's membership requirements for active status might be problematic, and it's not inexpensive. But I am hopeful that by making the oldest and most prestigious crime writer's organization more welcoming and diverse, the others will follow suit. Sisters in Crime is also doing excellent work; I write a diversity column called The Conversation Continues for their quarterly newsletter, and I know their new president, Lori Rader-Day, is very committed to diversity.

For now, the recognition of the caucuses is unofficial--we are investigating how to make them official under our current by-laws--and I've already talked to Kristen about repping Queer Crime Writers as a group to MWA, since she is already on the board --that way we can get things rolling already.

Are there any Dreamspinner authors here? The recent RWA situation has brought the problems with that publisher to our attention--please email me off this list directly at gregh121@... if you are a Dreamspinner or ChiZine author. You do not have to be an MWA member to talk to me about issues with those publishers.

Back to Bouchercon: I know Sacramento (this year) is also committed to a diverse program, as is Minneapolis in 2022 (one of the co-chairs is Terri Bischoff, a lesbian). New Orleans is 2021, and I don't know who on the local committee is going to be doing the programming--but I can find out. I also think there's a possibility of a bid to host 2023 in Philadelphia. 

Also, I encourage any or all of you to submit a short story to this year's Bouchercon anthology, California Screamin'. It's being edited by Art Taylor, and I know he is looking for diversity in the anthology. I've been in two Bouchercon anthologies, and Neil Plakcy was also in Florida Happens.  The submission call is here: shorturl.at/djsHT

I may be doing the New Orleans anthology again next year--not sure--but I have already committed to co-editing the Minneapolis anthology with Terri Bischoff.




xogreg

John Copenhaver
Fiction Writer
Lambda Literary Columnist
www.jcopenhaver.com
Twitter: johncopenhaver
Instagram: johncope74

Debut Novel, DODGING AND BURNING. Available now from Pegasus Books.



Joseph de Marco
 

Just got to see this.

I'm interested in getting involved and helping out however I can.

Joe


Brenda Buchanan
 

I'm so happy (and not at all surprised) to see all of the energy on this issue.  Thanks to everyone for your responses. Greg, it is FANTASTIC that you are now Exec VP of MWA and that Kristen and Jean are on the Board. Your post was packed full of great information.

On my end, I emailed Alex Segura (also on MWA board) who is one of the CWofC point people.  Here is my back and forth with him:

 

On Mon, Jan 27, 2020 at 9:41 PM Brenda Buchanan <mail@...> wrote:

Hello Alex:

I saw Kellye Garrett's recent post on Twitter about Crime Writers of Color's interest in working with conference planners to make crime cons more inclusive.  Hooray! 

I understand you, Mia and Zoe are heading up this initiative.

I'm on the organizing committee for New England Crime Bake and believe the Crime Bake chairs will be reaching out to you about this offer soon. 

But I'm writing tonight because I'm involved with Queer Crime Writers and there is a lot of interest among our members in supporting what you are doing and being a connection point for conference organizers who want to hear from more queer crime writers.  We discussed it on our list serve and John Copenhaver, Neil Plakcy, Stefani Deoul and a few others have put up their hands to help with this.

Do you have any thoughts about how we might be helpful to/best work in tandem with Crime Writers of Color on this initiative?  Thanks!

Brenda

 

Hi Brenda,

Thanks for reaching out! We'd love to pool our resources with Queer Crime Writers. Maybe it's just a matter of looping in one of your points of contact when we talk to events? We should definitely be talking more, overall! Looking forward to brainstorming.

 

Best,

Alex

 

 

Hello Alex, Mia, Zoe and Kellye,

 

I think what you’ve outlined is what needs to happen.  I’ll circle back with the QCW folks who volunteered to be point people and get you a list of contacts with email addresses and what part of the country they live in (which could matter, especially for small conferences/events, as writers based in a particular region may be able to connect more readily with those likely to jump on an opportunity). 

 

If you do the same, we’ll also be ready to respond if QCW is the first point of contact.  

B.

__________

 In the next few days, can those of you who are willing to be one of the point people on this for QCW send me your email and confirm where you live so I can put this list together for our use and to share with CWofC?

Thanks so much,

Brenda





 

So glad to be working with you on this vital community conversation.

 

B.

 

 

 

 

 



Catherine Maiorisi
 

Brenda, just a reminder that I put my hand up to assist with this effort.

Catherine Maiorisi

On Jan 29, 2020, at 6:31 PM, Brenda Buchanan <brenda@...> wrote:

I'm so happy (and not at all surprised) to see all of the energy on this issue.  Thanks to everyone for your responses. Greg, it is FANTASTIC that you are now Exec VP of MWA and that Kristen and Jean are on the Board. Your post was packed full of great information.

On my end, I emailed Alex Segura (also on MWA board) who is one of the CWofC point people.  Here is my back and forth with him:
 

On Mon, Jan 27, 2020 at 9:41 PM Brenda Buchanan <mail@...> wrote:

Hello Alex:

I saw Kellye Garrett's recent post on Twitter about Crime Writers of Color's interest in working with conference planners to make crime cons more inclusive.  Hooray! 

I understand you, Mia and Zoe are heading up this initiative.

I'm on the organizing committee for New England Crime Bake and believe the Crime Bake chairs will be reaching out to you about this offer soon. 

But I'm writing tonight because I'm involved with Queer Crime Writers and there is a lot of interest among our members in supporting what you are doing and being a connection point for conference organizers who want to hear from more queer crime writers.  We discussed it on our list serve and John Copenhaver, Neil Plakcy, Stefani Deoul and a few others have put up their hands to help with this.

Do you have any thoughts about how we might be helpful to/best work in tandem with Crime Writers of Color on this initiative?  Thanks!

Brenda

 

Hi Brenda,

Thanks for reaching out! We'd love to pool our resources with Queer Crime Writers. Maybe it's just a matter of looping in one of your points of contact when we talk to events? We should definitely be talking more, overall! Looking forward to brainstorming.

 

Best,

Alex

 
 

Hello Alex, Mia, Zoe and Kellye,

 

I think what you’ve outlined is what needs to happen.  I’ll circle back with the QCW folks who volunteered to be point people and get you a list of contacts with email addresses and what part of the country they live in (which could matter, especially for small conferences/events, as writers based in a particular region may be able to connect more readily with those likely to jump on an opportunity). 

 

If you do the same, we’ll also be ready to respond if QCW is the first point of contact.  

B.

__________

 In the next few days, can those of you who are willing to be one of the point people on this for QCW send me your email and confirm where you live so I can put this list together for our use and to share with CWofC?

Thanks so much,

Brenda





 

So glad to be working with you on this vital community conversation.

 

B.

 
 
 
 
 


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"Mia P. Manansala"
 

Hey everyone,

I'm part of the CWOC conference liaison committee and am a member of this group as well, so if you need someone as a bridge between the groups or to help coordinate, let me know.
--
Mia P. Manansala
https://www.miapmanansala.com/ 
FaceBook|Twitter| Instagram @MPMtheWriter